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Should You Say Merry Christmas Or Happy Holidays?

posted by onhold in "General"
December 18, 2018
Winter Holidays

Between November 1st and January 15th, more than 60 holidays are observed by 13 world religions and then some.

So is it politically correct to say “Merry Christmas”?  In larger cities like Toronto and Vancouver, a wide array of cultures and religions intermingle; people celebrate together and enjoy the diversity, so you may want to say “happy holidays”. On the other hand, in a country as multi-cultural as ours, we should be comfortable to say whatever feels right…after all, aren’t the wishes meant as an expression of goodwill, peace, and joy?!

November

1st  

All Saints’ Day – Christian

Samhain – Pagan

2nd   

All Souls’ Day – Christian

Coronation of Emperor Haile Selassie I – Rastafari

7th  

Diwali – Deepavali – Hindu, Sikh, Jain

Bandi Chhor Divas – Sikh

8th   

Saal Mubarak – Hindu

9th  

Dedication of the Lateran Basilica – Catholic Christian

Birth of the Báb – Baha’i

Bhai Dooj – Hindu

10th  

Birth of Baha’u’llah – Baha’i

11th  

Armistice Day – Interfaith

Remembrance Sunday

13th

Chhath Puja – Hindu

15th  

Nativity Fast begins – Orthodox Christian

17th

Eid-e Shuja – Islam

20th

Mawlid al-Nabi – Islam

21st  

Presentation of the Theotokos – Orthodox Christian

23rd  

Birthday of Guru Nanak Dev – Sikh

Kartik Poornima – Hindu

24th  

Martyrdom of Guru Tegh Bahadur – Sikh

25th  

Feast of Christ the King – Christian

26th  

Day of the Covenant – Baha’i

28th  

Ascension of Abdul’l-Baha – Baha’i

30th  

Saint Andrew’s Day – Christian

December

2nd

Advent Sunday – Christian

3rd  

Chanukah – Judaism

6th  

Saint Nicholas’ Day – Christian

8th  

Feast of the Immaculate Conception – Christian

Rohatsu (Bodhi Day) – Buddhist

12th  

Feast Day of Our Lady of Guadalupe – Catholic Christian

16th

Dhanu Sankranti – Hindu

18th

Fest of Tevet  – Judaism

21st  

Winter Solstice

Yule – Litha – Wicca/Pagan Northern and Southern hemispheres

Yule – Christian

21-25

Pancha Ganapati – Hindu

24th  

Christmas Eve – Christian

25th  

Christmas Day – Christian

Feast of the Nativity – Orthodox Christian

26th  

Saint Stephen’s Day – Christian

Zarathosht Diso (Death of Prophet Zarathushtra) – Zoroastrian

28th  

Holy Innocents – Christian

30th  

Feast of the Holy Family – Catholic Christian

31st  

New Year’s Eve/Hogmanay Watch Night – Christian

 

January

1st   

Mary, Mother of God – Catholic Christian

Feast of Saint Basil – Orthodox Christian

Gantan-sai (New Year) – Shinto

New Year’s Day – Christian

2-5

Mahayana New Year – Buddhist

5th  

Twelfth Night – Christian

6th  

Epiphany – Christian

Feast of the Theophany – Orthodox Christian

12th

Saint Hilary’s Day – Christian

13th  

Maghi – Sikh

Birthday of Guru Gobind Singh – Sikh

Baptism of the Lord Jesus – Christian

14th  

New Year – Orthodox Christian

Makar Sankranti – Hindu

Seijin no hi (Coming of Age Day) – Shinto

Blue Snowflake

This is a small list including just some of the more prevalent cultural and religious celebrations to make everyone aware of how much diversity we enjoy. Regardless of cultural or religious beliefs, let us celebrate the gift of respect and kindness that make our communities and the whole world a better place. We wish everyone a very safe and happy holiday season!